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2019 Provincial Candidate Questions & Answers


Our Province will be going to the Polls on April 16th to elect the next Provincial Government. While it is important for a Municipal Government, as a whole, to remain non-partisan - that does not mean that we are not interested in the beliefs and positions of Candidates and political parties - especially as either will affect our Municipality. This Council is very much interested in the views of our seven local candidates’ viewpoints and posed fourteen (14) questions to each of them.  We wish to thank all seven for participating in our Democratic system with such enthusiasm and commitment.  As well, a special thanks go to the four candidates who chose, or were able, to provide a response to the questions posed by our Council.  Here are their replies:


What are your personal beliefs pertaining to reports of a continued shortage of Provincial Judges and Prosecutors in the Province, which regularly results in criminal charges being dismissed?  What actions can we anticipate from your Party in this regard?

 

Derek Fildebrandt (Freedom Conservative Party of Alberta) - The FCP believes that our justice system needs serious reform. This issue is more about how we handle criminality in our society. We have made it clear we want to treat low level drug addicts as addicts and not hardened criminals. Our healthcare system should be responding to our massive drug epidemic by offering medical treatment programs before our justice system locks them into correctional facilities where they become hardened criminals. We should be reserving our justice system for those we are afraid of, not those we are mad at. We believe strongly in personal responsibility but also compassion and that rehabilitation and proactive health and community programing can reduce the massive strain on our justice system. 

 

Melissa Langmaid (NDP) - We are concerned about court backlogs and have been working hard to reduce them. We have hired 70 new crown prosecutors and 55 court staff to reduce the backlog. We have created 10 new Court of Queens Bench judge positions, but are frustrated that the Federal government has not yet filled those positions, despite our repeated pressure. We will continue to invest more resources in to prosecution and trials in the next four years.


Terry Nicholls (Independent) - My position on this is that all municipalities of the province should be able to appoint Judges and hire prosecutors as they are needed.  Doing so will allow the municipal leaders to expatiate the replacement of or increase the number of Judges and prosecutors and additional staff to support said Judges and Prosecutors.  More importantly, this will remove the party bias and bureaucracy out of the process.  As the province is responsible for providing funding for the current process the cost increases would be covered by the province through a new municipal justice fund derived from general revenues.

 

Roger Walker (Alberta Independence Party) - The rule of law is of utmost importance for a civil society.  We would validate the claims to ascertain where there is actually a shortage and correct it if necessary so charges are not dropped due to shortages. We would add Judges and Prosecutors where necessary to expedite cases. That being said once a country becomes prosperous and thriving crime goes down exponentially we believe that our low tax structure which includes no income tax on the first $45k of income will increase our competiveness and bring us back to full employment.  Full employment will drastically reduce the crime rate which will alleviate any shortage of judges/prosecutors.

 


At present, Municipalities over 5000 people are responsible for the vast majority of policing costs.   While rural homeowners do contribute to the provincial policing in this province (via income tax contributions), Urban home owners (who also pay the provincial costs) face additional police costs through municipal taxes.  What is your personal position on this matter and what actions can we anticipate from your Party in this regard?

 

Derek Fildebrandt (Freedom Conservative Party of Alberta) - We have made it very clear that we do not agree with the provincial government picking winners and losers when considering funding for extra strain on policing. That being said, we advocate for and champion greater decentralized decision making for municipalities and counties to better address their own needs. Municipal and county governments should be given strong autonomy on negotiating police contracts and have all options open to them for delivery of services. 

 

Melissa Langmaid (NDP) - We are committed to ensuring that Albertans are well protected by police, including both local police services and through the provincial agreement with the RCMP. We will continue to invest in rural policing and are always willing to discuss with municipalities the fair distribution of costs of protecting Albertans.


Terry Nicholls (Independent) - I believe that the funding model for our security services is flawed and has been for decades.  My proposal is to create a provincial police force that includes all of the province’s security assets.  Doing so will allow for a centralized leadership and standardized training and equipment for the front-line services.  Under this model, municipalities will be relieved of the cost of policing which will become the burden of the province.  The cost of this new security force would be covered by the money currently paid to Ottawa for the RCMP.  This would be supplemented by general revenues and a portion of the fines issued for violations of the traffic act.  Should this proposal be adopted, the security assets needed for each community can be assessed on a monthly basis and adjustments for manpower, assets etc. can be made quickly.

 

Roger Walker (Alberta Independence Party) - We would replace the RCMP with a provincial police force, the APP. This would be done in a phased approach to avoid disruption but will result in significant savings to Alberta tax payers making room to increase provincial police where needed.

 


Municipalities were dismayed by the lack of receiving a fair and equitable share of cannabis revenue.  What is your personal position on this matter and what actions can we anticipate from your Party in this regard?

 

Derek Fildebrandt (Freedom Conservative Party of Alberta) - We believe strongly that the government should as much as possible stay out of private and free markets. This would also include the cannabis market. The government acts like a bad drug dealer, always running out of supply and over charging. We believe that cannabis revenue should be directly invested back into the communities it comes from. That means the government gets out of the business of cannabis and communities get in the business of good strong economic growth as a result of private enterprise setting up shop. 

 

Melissa Langmaid (NDP) - We have provided $11.2 million to municipalities over two years to assist them in costs related to cannabis legalization. We respect that municipalities do not feel this covers the full costs. For the first two years the province will lose money on cannabis sales – as it pays for its start-up costs. We have been very clear that after the two years and both parties have a better understanding of the costs of legalization we will sit down with municipalities to work out a longer term solution.


Terry Nicholls (Independent) - Another failure of a party system of government.  The legalization of pot emphasises the disconnect between the province and its municipalities.  As a small businessman I understand the problem and feel that the remedy is to end the supply chain monopoly of the cannabis and alcohol supply and allow these businesses to ability purchase and sell their goods the same as every other retail business.  Doing so will end the need for the province to transfer revenue to municipalities but will allow the province to collect higher (excuse the pun) tax revenues as the cannabis industry grows.  Doing so will allow the market competition for product and customers to control’s prices and allow the business owner the flexibility to operate their business.


Roger Walker (Alberta Independence Party) - We would ensure that all municipalities are well funded through our municipal program.  This program will take the equalization payments, transfers and federal taxation that are currently sent to Ottawa and put them directly into municipalities at a rate of $36m per constituency on top of what they receive


 

The Municipal Sustainability Initiative has, for years, assisted municipalities with local infrastructure priorities.  What is your personal position on MSI funding and what actions can we anticipate from your Party in this regard? 

 

Derek Fildebrandt (Freedom Conservative Party of Alberta) - Our first priority is to build strong Albertan communities. To do that, we need to allow municipalities to make decisions at the local level. Municipal restructuring and annexing should be left to municipalities as much as possible and involve the provincial government as least as possible. The Municipal Sustainability Initiative is a great program to help build communities, and we certainly advocate for building strong communities, but we also plan to do that by getting out of the way and letting communities make their own decisions. 

 

Melissa Langmaid (NDP) - The Alberta NDP continue to support current levels of MSI funding. We also commit to negotiate a long term funding agreement to replace the expiring MSI. That agreement will be on par with the agreements recently negotiated with the big cities.


Terry Nicholls (Independent) - In 2018 the MSI provided over six hundred and fifty million dollars in funding and remains underfunded.  My proposal is to continue the MSI program beyond it’s expire date in 2022 until 2030 and increase funding by 10% each year for the next four years.  Doing so will allow smaller communities the ability to do more to ensure critical infrastructure is maintained and improved upon. 

 

Roger Walker (Alberta Independence Party) - Once again, Alberta Independence Party would ensure that all municipalities are well funded through our municipal program.  This program will take the equalization payments, transfers and federal taxation that are currently sent to Ottawa and put them directly into municipalities at a rate of $36m per constituency on top of what they receive now.  This is a dramatic increase in funding over current level at no additional cost to tax payer. This will allow municipalities to invest in projects that they choose and address specific riding requirements without any increases to municipal taxes. The increase to each riding of $36m would also allow each riding opportunity for growth, diversification and expansion. Currently Alberta will lose $160 Billion in the next 4 years to Ottawa. 

 

We have 87 ridings in the Province, if we don’t send that money to Ottawa, that’s 357 million a year for each riding as an example. There would be no need for new Taxes, ridings and municipalities could balance their budgets as well as create new diversification programs. Property taxes could be lowered instead of raised every year.



Do you believe that we can have a thriving oil and gas sector along with a renewable sector?    If so, how do you see them coming together?   How will your party support the move to a greener economy along with building the Alberta Oilsands?

 

Derek Fildebrandt (Freedom Conservative Party of Alberta) - This is simple. We need to start championing our world class energy sector. Our oil and gas industry is the most innovative and visionary in the world and has invested billion and billions of dollars back into environmental research and renewable energy. We don’t buy what the paid eco-activists are selling. The reality is, our innovative private sector has contributed the most to improve our systems and move us into the future. A greener economy is only possible when we have market buy in. It can not be forced into existence via massive taxpayer shakedowns and bad government investment decisions. 

 

Melissa Langmaid (NDP) - The Alberta NDP strongly believe that a strong oil and gas sector and a growing renewable energy sector are completely compatible. The future of Alberta’s economy rests upon getting better value for our resources through better access to market and by doing more upgrading and refining here in the province. And we are also committed to the goal of 30% of Alberta’s electricity powered by renewable energy. Our recent renewable energy auctions resulted in record low prices, cheaper than new natural gas generation would cost.


Terry Nicholls (Independent) - Absolutely!  I believe the oil and gas industry should lead the way on the transition to renewable energy.  By acquiring or partnering with the green sector, O&G can use their deep pockets to fund the research and development and implementation of green, renewable energy systems.  Doing so will allow this industry to remain relevant once the transition is complete.  Doing so will place the burden of cost on the oil & gas industry.  Doing so will allow our O&G industry to sell their new systems to a global market which in turn will provide addition tax revenues and increase the GDP.

 

Roger Walker (Alberta Independence Party) - The petroleum industry will always be a primary industry. We also believe that the provincial government should not be in the business of choosing winners and losers from one industry to the next.  Diversification programs will be developed as per each specific area/riding as markets and industry comes back to Alberta. All industries will enjoy our incredibly competitive tax structure that will allow them to thrive on their own merit.  This tax structure includes:

  • No income tax on the first $45k of income
  • 20% income tax on income over $45k ($50k of income pays $1k in tax; $100k of income pays $11k in tax).  This is the total income tax payable and replaces the provincial and federal amounts paid. This is massive decrease for all income levels compared to current rates
  • No Sales Tax - 8.5% business tax rate for domestic businesses
  • No Carbon Tax - 9% tax rate for foreign owned businesses

 


Given that approx. 6 billion Health Care dollars is presently being focused on substance abuse health issues, what is your party doing to address the opioid crisis and other health-related crises related to wide-spread substance abuse in Alberta?

 

Derek Fildebrandt (Freedom Conservative Party of Alberta) - We need to start treating drug addicts like patients, not inmates. We have to do a better job of addressing drug addiction in our communities through proactive programing and treatment options BEFORE they become hardened criminals and public security risks. Our system to often treats drug addiction as a criminal offense and hands otherwise functioning citizens to our corrections facilities to be molded into criminals. Lets lock up people we are afraid of, not people we are mad at. 

 

Melissa Langmaid (NDP) - The opioid crisis is a tragic issue that concerns all Albertans. We have a multi-facted approach to solving the problem. We have increased resources for addiction treatment creating thousands of new spaces, we expanded safe injections sites while making sure the community’s security concerns are addressed through increased police patrols and other supports, and we have distributed over 120,000 naloxone kits to health care providers.

 

Terry Nicholls (Independent) - The opioid crisis has presented a significant challenge for all levels of government and the people.  To address this challenge, we need a better plan.  A plan that includes all levels of our society.  A plan to that puts the resources and expertise into each community.  We need to support the police as they work to end the flow of the drug into our communities.  We need families and friends to identify users.  We need mental heath experts to help determine the reason the drug is taken and to help users get clean.  We need first responder’s to be trained to deal with an overdose situation.  

 

Roger Walker (Alberta Independence Party) - We will continue funding for health care at current levels with no interruption of services and believe that full employment will alleviate some of the burden on the health care system due to substance abuse issues. In addition, our platform offers 2 major improvements over the current system:

 

  • We believe there is big opportunity to address the percentage of funding that makes it to front line service (currently less that 30%); this is a management issue, not an issue with front line workers. We will do a full audit of health care management and significantly increase the percentage of funding that makes it to front line services.
  • We will no longer be bound to purchase health care supplies at inflated costs mainly from Ontario, this will result in significant savings that will be re-invested into health care providing significantly better health care at the same cost.

 

 

Alberta spends nearly half of its provincial budget on healthcare costs. There is a range of opinion and platform promises from boosting private health care, to reviewing Alberta Health Services to increasing front-line services. Where do you stand on this?

 

Derek Fildebrandt (Freedom Conservative Party of Alberta) - We have the largest health authority in the country, yet receive the 7th best care out of 10 provinces. This is unacceptable. We have made it very clear that we plan to restructure and reduce healthcare costs in Alberta WITHOUT laying off any front-line nurses, doctors, or care attendants. Our plan will address upper management bloated bureaucracy and entitlement and redirect those savings to reduce emergency lineups and invest in front line services. The FCP is committed to fixing the problem, not just holding steady on reckless spending like the establishment parties. 

8) What supports will your party offer to municipalities to assist them in economic development and diversification?  

 

Melissa Langmaid (NDP) - The Alberta NDP supports a strong public health care system. We inherited a health system lurching from crisis to crisis. We stabilized the system through consistent funding that kept up with a growing population. We commit to continue investing in health care. At the same time we will continue to look at management to find places where resources can be better deployed at direct care. We oppose the reckless privatization of health care which will lead to an American-style health system.


Terry Nicholls (Independent) - Please refer to the health care reform section of the AAIM Option paper, attached  

 

Roger Walker (Alberta Independence Party) - We will continue funding for health care at current levels and believe that full employment will alleviate some of the burden on the health care system due to substance abuse issues. In addition, our platform offers 2 major improvements over the current system

 

  • We believe there is big opportunity to address the percentage of funding that makes it to front line service (currently less that 30%); this is a management issue, not an issue with front line workers. We do a full audit of health care management and significantly increase the percentage of funding that makes it to front line services.
  • We will no longer be bound to purchase health care supplies at inflated costs mainly from Ontario, this will result in significant savings that will be re-invested into health care providing significantly better health care at the same cost.

 

 

 What supports will your party offer to municipalities to assist them in economic development and diversification?  

 

Derek Fildebrandt (Freedom Conservative Party of Alberta) – No response

        

Melissa Langmaid (NDP) - We are partaking in the largest economic diversification strategy since Peter Lougheed, which will bring in $75 billion in investment and create 70,000 new jobs. We also commit to supporting municipalities in diversifying through attracting value-added industry around the province.

Terry Nicholls (Independent) - Please refer to the economic diversity and communities’ sections of the AAIM Option paper, attached 

 

Roger Walker (Alberta Independence Party) - We will continue funding for health care at current levels and believe that full employment will alleviate some of the burden on the health care system due to substance abuse issues. In addition, our platform offers 2 major improvements over the current system

 

  • We believe there is big opportunity to address the percentage of funding that makes it to front line service (currently less that 30%); this is a management issue, not an issue with front line workers. We do a full audit of health care management and significantly increase the percentage of funding that makes it to front line services.
  • We will no longer be bound to purchase health care supplies at inflated costs mainly from Ontario, this will result in significant savings that will be re-invested into health care providing significantly better health care at the same cost.

 


Where significant number of younger children are now identified as struggling with issues related to mental health, how will your party support and promote the mental health of Alberta children?

 

Derek Fildebrandt (Freedom Conservative Party of Alberta) - Mental health is a very important and very critical issue in our society. As we have stated, we believe strongly in providing preventative health services to address mental health and often times corresponding drug and alcohol addictions. We need to focus on programs that keep non criminal health issues out of the courts and correctional systems and into treatment facilities and care programs. 

 

Melissa Langmaid (NDP) - In the past four years, we have almost doubled the amount of money dedicated to mental health services and we are committed to increasing coordination within the system and creating more avenues for quick-response mental health services for children in crisis. We will pilot storefront mental health clinics, and if successful, roll that model out across the province. 

 

Terry Nicholls (Independent) - My plan would see mental heath added to the school curriculum starting in grade seven.  Doing so will allow our children a method of identifying the symptoms of mental health and what can be done to prevent mental heath issues from affecting them.  In addition, each school should have a certified mental heath professional onsite to work with and educate children.

 

Roger Walker (Alberta Independence Party) - Our platform puts a significant amount of money back in the pockets of everyday Albertans, reducing the strain on families that have to struggle under the current tax structure. We will continue to fund mental health programs and constantly seek opportunities for improvement as our youth is our future so supporting them is one of our priorities.

 


Are you favourable to the idea of a Universal Basic Income, why or why not?                


Derek Fildebrandt (Freedom Conservative Party of Alberta) - We are not. We believe that good tax policy is good social policy. We believe that putting more money back in your pocket will ensure that you can grow your own money and wealth. The Universal Basic Income would create yet another big government bureaucracy that will take more than it delivers. This is why our party has put forth an aggressive tax cut program that will put more money back in the hands of hard-working Albertans and ensure we get people back to work. 


Melissa Langmaid (NDP) - The Alberta NDP does not have any plans to pursue a universal basic income at this time, but we are intrigued the by concept and interested in learning more of the latest research into its effects.


Terry Nicholls (Independent) - No, I do not support a universal basic income program. Why?  Programs like this do not motivate people to do more to improve themselves or their circumstances.  We all struggle to make ends meet, it’s called life.  As your MLA I would work to improve the economic situation so we can employ more people and with better wages.  We are at the threshold of a historic once in a lifetime opportunity and we need an MLA with a bold vision to make Chestermere Strathmore the place to be for research and development, light industrial, and manufacturing.  The AAIM Option outlines many proposals to take advantage of this opportunity.

 

Roger Walker (Alberta Independence Party) - We will not implement UBI. This type of economic safety net will not be required as our tax structure will create a completive environment that will result in full employment. We define full employment in any given industry at 3.75% unemployment. Our platform replaces EI and CPP with AEI and APP which is a self funding program that is significantly more flexible that the current system and will create better results in re-education and employment transition.  Existing CPP account will be transferred and will continue to be paid at a significantly higher rate.

 


What will your party do to address the predicted shortage in Senior Care facilities and long-term care beds and to ensure long-term care facilities and end of life care facilities have the staff, resources and training necessary to provide dignified, safe care in a timely manner?

 

Derek Fildebrandt (Freedom Conservative Party of Alberta) - Number one is to create fairness in the way the provincial government hands out government loans for infrastructure builds. Under the Tory era of government, private sector builders were encouraged to take government loans at zero percent interest, while other non profits were subject to interest loans for the same builds. The principle was simple; get more private investment into senior care facilities. However, it created a shortage of affordable senior care spaces at a reasonable cost. We believe the government should offer the same level of incentive loans for profit and non profit builders to drive the price down. 

Secondly, we have talked a lot about reducing redundancy in the Alberta Health Services (AHS). We have committed also to reducing the size of the bloated big government AHS so we can reinvest in front line care and have a direct positive result on resources needed to offer world class care to Albertans

 

Melissa Langmaid (NDP) - In the last election we committed to build 2,000 new long term care beds in four years. We surpasses that promise, building 2,100. We commit to build an additional 2,000 beds in the coming four years and to make sure there are sufficient funds to operate them. 

Terry Nicholls (Independent) - My proposal is to assess the needs of each community and determine the level of service the seniors need.  Once known, a multi level program can be developed that involves a support program for seniors to remain with the family unit as long as it is practical to do so.  This would include funding for a home improvement’s and a support service that would have a RN visit each senior for regular assessments of their health and circumstances.  The program includes funding for senior living facilities to be built in each community so relative’s can be close by. 

 

Roger Walker (Alberta Independence Party) - We will take back the tax dollars currently flowing to Ottawa which will allow us to fully fund and expand senior care facilities and create new spaces as required as our population ages.

 


As more jobs and tasks are replaced by robotics and computers, and governments look for ways to enhance this, how would you craft policy to ensure that the transition is as smooth and painless as possible for the average person?

  

Derek Fildebrandt (Freedom Conservative Party of Alberta) - I believe this starts with our education and training programs. We need to prepare youth and the next generation for the demands of the next generation. We have to have an education system that focuses on the core competencies needed for success, mathematics and sciences. We should be promoting post secondary programs to partner with secondary schools to offer in demand training for the jobs of the future. It starts with proactive education reform to address the needs of a future Alberta economy. 

 

Melissa Langmaid (NDP) - The Alberta NDP have a strategy to attract more high tech industries to the province, making us a continent-wide leader in areas such as artificial intelligence and health care technology. And we are making sure we have the educated workforce to fill those new jobs by creating 3,000 new post-secondary seats focused on high tech.


Terry Nicholls (Independent) - My input for new policy would be to ensure an education plan is included to help retrain workers in industry sectors that will be affected by automation.  The policy must ensure that no undue hardships will be suffered by workers who will lose their work due to automation.

 

Roger Walker (Alberta Independence Party) - Our system of Alberta Employment Insurance offers a flexible use of funds for retraining and education. Our low tax structure will ensure that new businesses and foreign investment are attracted to move to Alberta resulting in continued full employment as technology changes the employment landscape. We will support manufacturing companies being built in Alberta to capture more markets.

 

Persons with disabilities (for example) will receive a significant increase to what they are currently receiving. We will also develop training and retraining programs that are currently lacking for persons that have disabilities who want and can re-enter the work force to add the necessary building blocks that are not offered in our current system. 


 

Statistics prove that keeping Seniors in their homes with adequate supports provides them with better quality of life and saves up to four times the amount it costs for them to have facility-based long term care.  The unintended consequence of keeping Seniors in their homes, is that affordable homes for younger people do not come on the market.  Would your party be in favor of diverting some portion of the savings realized from supporting Seniors to stay in their homes, to affordable sustainable housing projects for first time home buyers?

 

Derek Fildebrandt (Freedom Conservative Party of Alberta) - We believe strongly that true free market forces will ultimately create affordable options for consumers. As I stated before, it is about fairness in our system and allowing families to ultimately make decisions that work for them. 

 

Melissa Langmaid (NDP) - We understand that it is getting more and more difficult for people to buy their first home. And new federal mortgage rules don’t make it any easier. We commit to creating Attainable Homes Alberta, an organization that will work with local municipalities to increase the supply of affordably-priced homes and provide down payment assistance to modest income families hoping to buy their first home.

Terry Nicholls (Independent) - No, the savings realized should be reinvested into senior care.  Doing so will better ensure that seniors can be well cared for.  Saying that, for first time home buyers, I am in favor of setting the down payment limit at five percent of the asking price.  Moreover, I would also agree to providing a loan to a maximum of twenty thousand dollars for first time home buyers that meet the mortgage pre-qualification but do not have sufficient savings to meet the down payment.  The home buyer will claim the loan in whole or in part as income on the annual tax return.

 

Roger Walker (Alberta Independence Party) - With full employment and a low tax structure, the need for government funded housing decreases. When young people have the means to pay for housing through their own employment, the market will provide the supply of new accommodations to meet the demand.  We will continue existing affordable housing programs for those that need it. 

 


What will be the ideal source of revenue for your provincial government, that will have the least negative effect on the economy? PST?  HST?

 

Derek Fildebrandt (Freedom Conservative Party of Alberta) - We believe strongly that individuals grow wealth, not governments. We do not have a revenue problem, we have a spending problem coupled with big government intervention tendencies. Our plan is to drastically reduce the burden on every day Albertan families by getting out of their purses and wallets, reducing the size and inefficiencies of government, and streamlining government spending to focus on programs and services that matter to Albertans.  

 

Melissa Langmaid (NDP) - The Alberta NDP will not implement a sales tax. We believe the best path forward for Alberta is to diversify our economy in a manner that will generate tax revenue for a wider range of industries and jobs so we become less vulnerable to the ups and downs of the oil industry.

Terry Nicholls (Independent) - My proposal is a flat tax of 20% for both personal and business tax.  This tax would eliminate all other forms of provincial tax including the education tax and the many levies and riders, etc.  Individuals and businesses alike can reduce their tax rate to 10% by demonstrating their commitment to the environment, senior citizen’s, the handicapped and their community.  This tax system will leave more money in the pockets for people and business to save or invest.  See the tax reform section of the AAIM option at www.theaaim.ca for more info.

 

 

Roger Walker (Alberta Independence Party) - We will not introduce a PST, HST or any other new taxes.  Albertans currently pay $50.3B in federal taxes and only 20% of that is transferred and/or spent directly in Alberta. Under our platform, Albertans will no longer send that $50.3B to Ottawa and those funds will be kept in Alberta in form of tax cuts, funding for existing social programs and our increased municipal funding.  While consumption-based taxes are viewed by some as an attractive source of revenue, we believe the administrative burden of sales taxes have a disproportional effect on small businesses; therefore, our platform calls for the elimination of broad based sales taxes.  We can have a low tax structure, well funded social programs and a surplus budget that allows us to start paying down debt if we keep Albertan’s tax dollars in Alberta.

 

As a footnote: The UCP’s plan to call a referendum on transfer payments is a false narrative will never come to fruition due to the following facts: 

 

1) A Constitutional Challenge would be required to be called at a cost of $22 million to Alberta tax payers which would go to all 10 provinces in Canada; however, only 5 provinces are officially receiving those transfer payments. Ontario through centralization receives an automatic $1Billion as Ontario officially manages that program.  It has 1500 jobs associated to that specific program. Ontario alone would not vote for this because they would want to keep centralization.

 

2) 26.5 million Canadians are receiving the benefits of those transfer payments

 

3) Every province votes to stop transfer payments and Alberta would definitely lose as the rest of Canada would never vote for this.  

 



Date Updated: April 10, 2019 - 12:53 PM